Recent assignment work


Novelist RF Kuang, for The Guardian

Novelist R. F. Kuang poses for a portrait in the Back Bay area of Boston, Massachusetts, USA, on Tue., March 21, 2023. Kuang is the author of, most recently, "Yellowface," which she calls a "psychological thriller and satire about the publishing industry," published in May 2023. "Yellowface" is Kuang's fifth novel.
Novelist R. F. Kuang poses for a portrait in the Commonwealth Avenue Mall in the Back Bay area of Boston, Massachusetts, USA, on Tue., March 21, 2023. Kuang is the author of, most recently, "Yellowface," which she calls a "psychological thriller and satire about the publishing industry," published in May 2023. "Yellowface" is Kuang's fifth novel.
Novelist R. F. Kuang is seen near the Main Staircase of Boston Public Library in Boston, Massachusetts, USA, on Tue., March 21, 2023. Kuang is the author of, most recently, "Yellowface," which she calls a "psychological thriller and satire about the publishing industry," published in May 2023. "Yellowface" is Kuang's fifth novel.
Novelist R. F. Kuang is seen outside Boston Public Library in Copley Square, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, on Tue., March 21, 2023. Kuang is the author of, most recently, "Yellowface," which she calls a "psychological thriller and satire about the publishing industry," published in May 2023. "Yellowface" is Kuang's fifth novel.
Novelist R. F. Kuang is seen near the Main Staircase of Boston Public Library in Boston, Massachusetts, USA, on Tue., March 21, 2023. Kuang is the author of, most recently, "Yellowface," which she calls a "psychological thriller and satire about the publishing industry," published in May 2023. "Yellowface" is Kuang's fifth novel.

Classified document leak in Dighton, Mass., for the Wall Street Journal

Law enforcement including Dighton Police block traffic on Maple Street in Dighton, Mass., USA, where it is believed that Jack Teixeira lives. Teixeira is a member of the 102nd Intelligence Wing of the Massachusetts Air National Guard and it is alleged Teixeira leaked classified military documents relating to Russia's war in Ukraine.
News reporters are seen in woods on Maple Street in Dighton, Mass., USA, on Thu., April 13, 2023, near where it is believed that Jack Teixeira lives. Teixeira is a member of the 102nd Intelligence Wing of the Massachusetts Air National Guard and it is alleged Teixeira leaked classified military documents relating to Russia's war in Ukraine.
Tyler Ellinwood, 23, (white hoodie) and brother Hayden Ellinwood, 19, speak to the press on Maple Street in Dighton, Mass., USA, on Thu., April 13, 2023, near where it is believed that Jack Teixeira lives. Teixeira is a member of the 102nd Intelligence Wing of the Massachusetts Air National Guard and it is alleged Teixeira leaked classified military documents relating to Russia's war in Ukraine. Tyler Ellinwood said he couldn't return to his home due to the police road block and said he was 2 years ahead of Teixeira at Dighton-Rehoboth High School and knew of Teixeira, though wasn't a close friend.
Dennis Dutre (gray shirt), of Mansfield, and Pete Lemieux, of Taunton, sat at the bar in 1712 Restaurant and Bar in downtown Dighton, Mass., USA, on Thu., April 13, 2023. The pair have known each other since 1st grade in Dighton. "First of all [the arrest] surprised the hell out of me. This is like a little backwater town," said Lemieux, of the news of Jack Teixeira's arrest. Dighton is believed to be where Jack Teixeira lived. Teixeira is a member of the 102nd Intelligence Wing of the Massachusetts Air National Guard and it is alleged Teixeira leaked classified military documents relating to Russia's war in Ukraine. The TVs in the bar were playing a Boston Bruins hockey game, though a few patrons were talking about Teixeira's arrest.

Vineyward Wind station and cable route installation on Cape Cod, for Bloomberg

Workers install steel shoring to further excavate a trench where submarine cables come onshore for the Vineyard Wind Project at Covell’s Beach in Barnstable, Massachusetts, US, on Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2022. Vineyard Wind is currently building the nation's first utility-scale offshore wind energy project over 15 miles off the coast of Massachusetts. Photographer: M. Scott Brauer/Bloomberg
An onshore substation under construction at the Vineyard Wind project in Hyannis, Massachusetts, US, on Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2022. Vineyard Wind is currently building the nation's first utility-scale offshore wind energy project over 15 miles off the coast of Massachusetts. Photographer: M. Scott Brauer/Bloomberg
Workers splice copper cables while building the grounding grid at an onshore substation at the Vineyard Wind project in Hyannis, Massachusetts, US, on Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2022. Vineyard Wind is currently building the nation's first utility-scale offshore wind energy project over 15 miles off the coast of Massachusetts. Photographer: M. Scott Brauer/Bloomberg
Workers install steel shoring to further excavate a trench where submarine cables come onshore for the Vineyard Wind Project at Covell’s Beach in Barnstable, Massachusetts, US, on Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2022. Vineyard Wind is currently building the nation's first utility-scale offshore wind energy project over 15 miles off the coast of Massachusetts. Photographer: M. Scott Brauer/Bloomberg
Workers splice copper cables while building the grounding grid at an onshore substation at the Vineyard Wind project in Hyannis, Massachusetts, US, on Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2022. Vineyard Wind is currently building the nation's first utility-scale offshore wind energy project over 15 miles off the coast of Massachusetts. Photographer: M. Scott Brauer/Bloomberg
Workers install steel shoring to further excavate a trench where submarine cables come onshore for the Vineyard Wind Project at Covell’s Beach in Barnstable, Massachusetts, US, on Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2022. Vineyard Wind is currently building the nation's first utility-scale offshore wind energy project over 15 miles off the coast of Massachusetts. Photographer: M. Scott Brauer/Bloomberg

Barbara Lynch restaurant employees allege abuse, for the New York Times

Sara Hatanaka is a general manager of an upscale restaurant on Newbury Street in Boston, Massachusetts, USA, , seen here on Mon., April 17, 2023. Hatanaka was general manager of No. 9 Park and regional manager at The Butcher Shop and B&G Oysters, both operated by Barbara Lynch.
Tim Dearing worked on menu development at Drink, Sportello, and Menton, three Boston restaurants operated by Barbara Lynch, until he was fired a month ago by Lynch in front of 30 coworkers, seen here near his home  in Brighton, Massachusetts, USA, on Mon., April 17, 2023. "I worked for 3 years for that crazy lady," Dearing said.
Sara Hatanaka is a general manager of an upscale restaurant on Newbury Street in Boston, Massachusetts, USA, , seen here on Mon., April 17, 2023. Hatanaka was general manager of No. 9 Park and regional manager at The Butcher Shop and B&G Oysters, both operated by Barbara Lynch.
Tim Dearing worked on menu development at Drink, Sportello, and Menton, three Boston restaurants operated by Barbara Lynch, until he was fired a month ago by Lynch in front of 30 coworkers, seen here near his home  in Brighton, Massachusetts, USA, on Mon., April 17, 2023. "I worked for 3 years for that crazy lady," Dearing said.

Form Energy's Iron-Air Battery, for Bloomberg Businessweek

Full-scale iron-air batteries stand in the full-scale battery testing area of the Form Energy lab in Somerville, Massachusetts, USA, on Tue., March 21, 2023. Each orange enclosure holds one iron-air battery, the tall piece between orange walls enclosed in white, low-cost commodity plastic similar to what milk jugs are made of. A typical power plant built using these batteries would have tens of thousands of these batteries, according to Form Energy co-founder and CTO Billy Woodford. The batteries work by rusting and derusting an iron electrode inside the battery. According to its website, Form Energy is an "energy storage technology and manufacturing company." The company has developed an iron-air battery that stores energy for 100 hours and is aimed at replacing traditional powerplants by storing energy generated from renewable energy sources such as wind or solar. In this lab, the company develops and tests sub-scale and full-scale iron-air batteries. Other facilities operated by the company elsewhere in the US handle more full-scale production and testing of the batteries.
Billy Woodford, co-founder and CTO of Form Energy, is seen in the full-scale battery testing area in the Form Energy lab in Somerville, Massachusetts, USA, on Tue., March 21, 2023. According to its website, Form Energy is an "energy storage technology and manufacturing company." The company has developed an iron-air battery that stores energy for 100 hours and is aimed at replacing traditional powerplants by storing energy generated from renewable energy sources such as wind or solar. In this lab, the company develops and tests sub-scale and full-scale iron-air batteries. Other facilities operated by the company elsewhere in the US handle more full-scale production and testing of the batteries.
A full-scale iron electrode lays on a rack before quality control analysis in the Form Energy lab in Somerville, Massachusetts, USA, on Tue., March 21, 2023. Iron-air batteries work by pairing an air electrode with an iron electrode and rusting and derusting the iron electrodes. According to its website, Form Energy is an "energy storage technology and manufacturing company." The company has developed an iron-air battery that stores energy for 100 hours and is aimed at replacing traditional powerplants by storing energy generated from renewable energy sources such as wind or solar. In this lab, the company develops and tests sub-scale and full-scale iron-air batteries. Other facilities operated by the company elsewhere in the US handle more full-scale production and testing of the batteries.
Sub-scale iron-air batteries stand in a testing incubator in the Form Energy lab in Somerville, Massachusetts, USA, on Tue., March 21, 2023. Each plastic container is a single miniature iron-air battery. The testing process in these incubators looks at the performance of different iron materials, duty cycles when the battery is charged and discharged, and performance of the battery at different temperatures. Once a battery configuration shows good performance in this testing environment, it is recreated at larger scale for further testing. The batteries work by rusting and derusting an iron electrode inside the battery. According to its website, Form Energy is an "energy storage technology and manufacturing company." The company has developed an iron-air battery that stores energy for 100 hours and is aimed at replacing traditional powerplants by storing energy generated from renewable energy sources such as wind or solar. In this lab, the company develops and tests sub-scale and full-scale iron-air batteries. Other facilities operated by the company elsewhere in the US handle more full-scale production and testing of the batteries.
A worker analyzes a full-scale iron electrode after a process trial in the Form Energy lab in Somerville, Massachusetts, USA, on Tue., March 21, 2023. Iron-air batteries work by pairing an air electrode with an iron electrode and rusting and derusting the iron electrodes. According to its website, Form Energy is an "energy storage technology and manufacturing company." The company has developed an iron-air battery that stores energy for 100 hours and is aimed at replacing traditional powerplants by storing energy generated from renewable energy sources such as wind or solar. In this lab, the company develops and tests sub-scale and full-scale iron-air batteries. Other facilities operated by the company elsewhere in the US handle more full-scale production and testing of the batteries.
Full-scale iron-air batteries stand in the full-scale battery testing area of the Form Energy lab in Somerville, Massachusetts, USA, on Tue., March 21, 2023. Each orange enclosure holds one iron-air battery, the tall piece between orange walls enclosed in white, low-cost commodity plastic similar to what milk jugs are made of. A typical power plant built using these batteries would have tens of thousands of these batteries, according to Form Energy co-founder and CTO Billy Woodford. The batteries work by rusting and derusting an iron electrode inside the battery. According to its website, Form Energy is an "energy storage technology and manufacturing company." The company has developed an iron-air battery that stores energy for 100 hours and is aimed at replacing traditional powerplants by storing energy generated from renewable energy sources such as wind or solar. In this lab, the company develops and tests sub-scale and full-scale iron-air batteries. Other facilities operated by the company elsewhere in the US handle more full-scale production and testing of the batteries.
Sub-scale iron electrodes lay on a workbench before testing in the Form Energy lab in Somerville, Massachusetts, USA, on Tue., March 21, 2023. These components will be used for sub-scale testing different battery configurations. Iron-air batteries work by pairing an air electrode with an iron electrode and rusting and derusting the iron electrodes. According to its website, Form Energy is an "energy storage technology and manufacturing company." The company has developed an iron-air battery that stores energy for 100 hours and is aimed at replacing traditional powerplants by storing energy generated from renewable energy sources such as wind or solar. In this lab, the company develops and tests sub-scale and full-scale iron-air batteries. Other facilities operated by the company elsewhere in the US handle more full-scale production and testing of the batteries.
Pellets of "Direct Reduced Iron" are seen in the Form Energy lab in Somerville, Massachusetts, USA, on Tue., March 21, 2023. This porous form of iron is the lowest cost form of metallic iron available and is used to create the iron electrode in Form Energy's iron-air batteries. Among the benefits of Form Energy's technology is that it is produced with low-cost and safe materials compared to other types of batteries. According to its website, Form Energy is an "energy storage technology and manufacturing company." The company has developed an iron-air battery that stores energy for 100 hours and is aimed at replacing traditional powerplants by storing energy generated from renewable energy sources such as wind or solar. In this lab, the company develops and tests sub-scale and full-scale iron-air batteries. Other facilities operated by the company elsewhere in the US handle more full-scale production and testing of the batteries.

Bulgarian folk dancers gather in Sofia for the International Day of Dance


While in Sofia, Bulgaria last month, I had the phenomenal luck to run into a gathering of hundreds of folk dancers from around the country gathered outside the National Palace of Culture (NDK) one morning. The participants were dressed in costumes from different regions around Bulgaria and were performing at NDK that night for the International Day of Dance. They were taking some promotional group photos that morning, including some with a drone. 

Uber/Lyft driver labor rally for Bloomberg


Uber and Lyft driver Ehab Hilali (46, six years driving) uses a bullhorn to speak to the crowd as Uber and Lyft drivers enter a local Uber Greenlight office during a rally in Saugus, Massachusetts, US, on Wednesday, March 1, 2023.  Uber and Lyft drivers gathered to demand the ride-hailing platform reinstate workers "unfairly deactivated" and voice support for legislation that would give drivers for the companies the ability to unionize, access to a base pay rate and protections such as unemployment insurance. Photographer: M. Scott Brauer/Bloomberg
Uber and Lyft drivers ahead of a collective drive to a local Uber Greenlight office during a rally to unionize in Lynn, Massachusetts, US, on Wednesday, March 1, 2023.  Uber and Lyft drivers gathered to demand the ride-hailing platform reinstate workers "unfairly deactivated" and voice support for legislation that would give drivers for the companies the ability to unionize, access to a base pay rate and protections such as unemployment insurance.
Uber and Lyft drivers ahead of a collective drive to a local Uber Greenlight office during a rally to unionize in Lynn, Massachusetts, US, on Wednesday, March 1, 2023.  Uber and Lyft drivers gathered to demand the ride-hailing platform reinstate workers "unfairly deactivated" and voice support for legislation that would give drivers for the companies the ability to unionize, access to a base pay rate and protections such as unemployment insurance. Photographer: M. Scott Brauer/Bloomberg
Uber and Lyft drivers rally to unionize in front of a local Uber Greenlight office in Saugus, Massachusetts, US, on Wednesday, March 1, 2023.  Uber and Lyft drivers gathered to demand the ride-hailing platform reinstate workers "unfairly deactivated" and voice support for legislation that would give drivers for the companies the ability to unionize, access to a base pay rate and protections such as unemployment insurance.
Uber and Lyft drivers rally to unionize in front of a local Uber Greenlight office in Saugus, Massachusetts, US, on Wednesday, March 1, 2023.  Uber and Lyft drivers gathered to demand the ride-hailing platform reinstate workers "unfairly deactivated" and voice support for legislation that would give drivers for the companies the ability to unionize, access to a base pay rate and protections such as unemployment insurance. Photographer: M. Scott Brauer/Bloomberg
Uber and Lyft drivers rally to unionize in front of a local Uber Greenlight office in Saugus, Massachusetts, US, on Wednesday, March 1, 2023.  Uber and Lyft drivers gathered to demand the ride-hailing platform reinstate workers "unfairly deactivated" and voice support for legislation that would give drivers for the companies the ability to unionize, access to a base pay rate and protections such as unemployment insurance. Photographer: M. Scott Brauer/Bloomberg
Uber and Lyft drivers rally to unionize in front of a local Uber Greenlight office in Saugus, Massachusetts, US, on Wednesday, March 1, 2023.  Uber and Lyft drivers gathered to demand the ride-hailing platform reinstate workers "unfairly deactivated" and voice support for legislation that would give drivers for the companies the ability to unionize, access to a base pay rate and protections such as unemployment insurance. Photographer: M. Scott Brauer/Bloomberg
Uber and Lyft drivers ahead of a collective drive to a local Uber Greenlight office during a rally to unionize in Lynn, Massachusetts, US, on Wednesday, March 1, 2023.  Uber and Lyft drivers gathered to demand the ride-hailing platform reinstate workers "unfairly deactivated" and voice support for legislation that would give drivers for the companies the ability to unionize, access to a base pay rate and protections such as unemployment insurance.
Uber and Lyft drivers rally to unionize in front of a local Uber Greenlight office in Saugus, Massachusetts, US, on Wednesday, March 1, 2023.  Uber and Lyft drivers gathered to demand the ride-hailing platform reinstate workers "unfairly deactivated" and voice support for legislation that would give drivers for the companies the ability to unionize, access to a base pay rate and protections such as unemployment insurance. Photographer: M. Scott Brauer/Bloomberg
Uber and Lyft drivers rally to unionize in front of a local Uber Greenlight office in Saugus, Massachusetts, US, on Wednesday, March 1, 2023.  Uber and Lyft drivers gathered to demand the ride-hailing platform reinstate workers "unfairly deactivated" and voice support for legislation that would give drivers for the companies the ability to unionize, access to a base pay rate and protections such as unemployment insurance.
Roxana Rivera, Assistant to the President of the SEIU 32BJ union, speaks as Uber and Lyft drivers enter a local Uber Greenlight office during a rally in Saugus, Massachusetts, US, on Wednesday, March 1, 2023.  Uber and Lyft drivers gathered to demand the ride-hailing platform reinstate workers "unfairly deactivated" and voice support for legislation that would give drivers for the companies the ability to unionize, access to a base pay rate and protections such as unemployment insurance. Photographer: M. Scott Brauer/Bloomberg
Uber and Lyft drivers ahead of a collective drive to a local Uber Greenlight office during a rally to unionize in Lynn, Massachusetts, US, on Wednesday, March 1, 2023.  Uber and Lyft drivers gathered to demand the ride-hailing platform reinstate workers "unfairly deactivated" and voice support for legislation that would give drivers for the companies the ability to unionize, access to a base pay rate and protections such as unemployment insurance.
Uber and Lyft drivers rally to unionize in front of a local Uber Greenlight office in Saugus, Massachusetts, US, on Wednesday, March 1, 2023.  Uber and Lyft drivers gathered to demand the ride-hailing platform reinstate workers "unfairly deactivated" and voice support for legislation that would give drivers for the companies the ability to unionize, access to a base pay rate and protections such as unemployment insurance.
Uber and Lyft drivers rally to unionize in front of a local Uber Greenlight office in Saugus, Massachusetts, US, on Wednesday, March 1, 2023.  Uber and Lyft drivers gathered to demand the ride-hailing platform reinstate workers "unfairly deactivated" and voice support for legislation that would give drivers for the companies the ability to unionize, access to a base pay rate and protections such as unemployment insurance. Photographer: M. Scott Brauer/Bloomberg
Uber and Lyft drivers rally to unionize in front of a local Uber Greenlight office in Saugus, Massachusetts, US, on Wednesday, March 1, 2023.  Uber and Lyft drivers gathered to demand the ride-hailing platform reinstate workers "unfairly deactivated" and voice support for legislation that would give drivers for the companies the ability to unionize, access to a base pay rate and protections such as unemployment insurance.

For Bloomberg, I photographed a large rally of Uber and Lyft rideshare drivers as they rallied for labor rights in Lynn and Saugus, Massachusetts. The drivers gathered to demand the ride-hailing platform reinstate workers “unfairly deactivated” and voice support for legislation that would give drivers for the companies the ability to unionize, access to a base pay rate and protections such as unemployment insurance. 

New story: Gund Kwok all-Asian-women Lion Dance troupe prepares for Lunar New Year


I’ve added a new story to the photojournalism section of this website. The story follows Gund Kwok, the United States’ first and only all-Asian-women lion dance troupe as they prepare for 2023 Lunar New Year celebrations around Boston. The group is now in its 25th year and led by the 65-year-old Cheng Imm Tan, who started the group as a way to empower Asian women to show their creativity, power, and strength in an art form that has historically been open only to men. 

Click through to see the full story

Recent portraits on assignment


Gautam Adani, Asia's richest man, for the New York Times

Gautam Adani is the chairman and founder of Adani Group, a multi-national port operations and development company based in Ahmedabad, India. Adani is photographed here in the Four Seasons Hotel in Boston, Massachusetts, USA, on Wed., Oct. 26, 2022. According to business magazine lists, billionaire Adani is the richest person in India and is among the wealthiest people in the world.
Gautam Adani is the chairman and founder of Adani Group, a multi-national port operations and development company based in Ahmedabad, India. Adani is photographed here in the Four Seasons Hotel in Boston, Massachusetts, USA, on Wed., Oct. 26, 2022. According to business magazine lists, billionaire Adani is the richest person in India and is among the wealthiest people in the world.
Gautam Adani is the chairman and founder of Adani Group, a multi-national port operations and development company based in Ahmedabad, India. Adani is photographed here in the Four Seasons Hotel in Boston, Massachusetts, USA, on Wed., Oct. 26, 2022. According to business magazine lists, billionaire Adani is the richest person in India and is among the wealthiest people in the world.
Gautam Adani is the chairman and founder of Adani Group, a multi-national port operations and development company based in Ahmedabad, India. Adani is photographed here in the Four Seasons Hotel in Boston, Massachusetts, USA, on Wed., Oct. 26, 2022. According to business magazine lists, billionaire Adani is the richest person in India and is among the wealthiest people in the world.
Gautam Adani is the chairman and founder of Adani Group, a multi-national port operations and development company based in Ahmedabad, India. Adani is photographed here in the Four Seasons Hotel in Boston, Massachusetts, USA, on Wed., Oct. 26, 2022. According to business magazine lists, billionaire Adani is the richest person in India and is among the wealthiest people in the world.
Gautam Adani is the chairman and founder of Adani Group, a multi-national port operations and development company based in Ahmedabad, India. Adani is photographed here in the Four Seasons Hotel in Boston, Massachusetts, USA, on Wed., Oct. 26, 2022. According to business magazine lists, billionaire Adani is the richest person in India and is among the wealthiest people in the world.

Anabel Graetz, film actress at age 80, for the Guardian

Anabel Graetz, age 80, is an actress who started working in film and television in her 60s, seen at her home in Lexington, Massachusetts, USA, on Sat., Oct. 29, 2022. Graetz says she studied acting, music, and singing. "I performed on stage for all my life thinking, of course, that film wasn't for me," she said. "Who starts being in films when they're in their 60s or 70s," Graetz laughs. "The funny thing is when I was a kid I thought I wanted to be in movies."
Anabel Graetz, age 80, is an actress who started working in film and television in her 60s, seen at her home in Lexington, Massachusetts, USA, on Sat., Oct. 29, 2022. Graetz says she studied acting, music, and singing. "I performed on stage for all my life thinking, of course, that film wasn't for me," she said. "Who starts being in films when they're in their 60s or 70s," Graetz laughs. "The funny thing is when I was a kid I thought I wanted to be in movies."
Anabel Graetz, age 80, is an actress who started working in film and television in her 60s, seen at her home in Lexington, Massachusetts, USA, on Sat., Oct. 29, 2022. Graetz says she studied acting, music, and singing. "I performed on stage for all my life thinking, of course, that film wasn't for me," she said. "Who starts being in films when they're in their 60s or 70s," Graetz laughs. "The funny thing is when I was a kid I thought I wanted to be in movies."
Anabel Graetz, age 80, is an actress who started working in film and television in her 60s, seen at her home in Lexington, Massachusetts, USA, on Sat., Oct. 29, 2022. Graetz says she studied acting, music, and singing. "I performed on stage for all my life thinking, of course, that film wasn't for me," she said. "Who starts being in films when they're in their 60s or 70s," Graetz laughs. "The funny thing is when I was a kid I thought I wanted to be in movies."
Anabel Graetz, age 80, is an actress who started working in film and television in her 60s, seen at her home in Lexington, Massachusetts, USA, on Sat., Oct. 29, 2022. Graetz says she studied acting, music, and singing. "I performed on stage for all my life thinking, of course, that film wasn't for me," she said. "Who starts being in films when they're in their 60s or 70s," Graetz laughs. "The funny thing is when I was a kid I thought I wanted to be in movies."

Steven Pinker, author and Harvard professor, for Le Point

Author and psychologist Steven Pinker is seen here on Harvard's campus outside William James Hall in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, on Tue., Sept. 20, 2022. Pinker is the Johnstone Family Professor in the Department of Psychology at Harvard University. According to his bio, Pinker is "an experimental psychologist who conducts research in visual cognition, psycholinguistics, and social relations" and is the author of numerous popular science books on the subjects of human cognition and language.
Author and psychologist Steven Pinker is seen here in his Harvard campus office in William James Hall in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, on Tue., Sept. 20, 2022. Pinker is the Johnstone Family Professor in the Department of Psychology at Harvard University. According to his bio, Pinker is "an experimental psychologist who conducts research in visual cognition, psycholinguistics, and social relations" and is the author of numerous popular science books on the subjects of human cognition and language.
Author and psychologist Steven Pinker is seen here on Harvard's campus outside William James Hall in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, on Tue., Sept. 20, 2022. Pinker is the Johnstone Family Professor in the Department of Psychology at Harvard University. According to his bio, Pinker is "an experimental psychologist who conducts research in visual cognition, psycholinguistics, and social relations" and is the author of numerous popular science books on the subjects of human cognition and language.
Author and psychologist Steven Pinker is seen here on Harvard's campus outside William James Hall in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, on Tue., Sept. 20, 2022. Pinker is the Johnstone Family Professor in the Department of Psychology at Harvard University. According to his bio, Pinker is "an experimental psychologist who conducts research in visual cognition, psycholinguistics, and social relations" and is the author of numerous popular science books on the subjects of human cognition and language.
Author and psychologist Steven Pinker is seen here in his Harvard campus office in William James Hall in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, on Tue., Sept. 20, 2022. Pinker is the Johnstone Family Professor in the Department of Psychology at Harvard University. According to his bio, Pinker is "an experimental psychologist who conducts research in visual cognition, psycholinguistics, and social relations" and is the author of numerous popular science books on the subjects of human cognition and language.

Lisa Iezzoni, Harvard Professor of Medicine, for the New York Times

Lisa Iezzoni, MD, MSc, has published research this month in the Health Affairs medical journal about how physicians are uncomfortable caring for people with disabilities, seen here near her office in Radcliffe Yard at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, on Wed., Oct. 12, 2022. Iezzoni is a Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and a researcher at Massachusetts General Hospital. Iezzoni, 68, has been diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) for 46 years and has personally experienced some of the same difficulties in accessing healthcare as is described in her research.
Lisa Iezzoni, MD, MSc, has published research this month in the Health Affairs medical journal about how physicians are uncomfortable caring for people with disabilities, seen here near her office in Radcliffe Yard at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, on Wed., Oct. 12, 2022. Iezzoni is a Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and a researcher at Massachusetts General Hospital. Iezzoni, 68, has been diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) for 46 years and has personally experienced some of the same difficulties in accessing healthcare as is described in her research.
Lisa Iezzoni, MD, MSc, has published research this month in the Health Affairs medical journal about how physicians are uncomfortable caring for people with disabilities, seen here near her office in Radcliffe Yard at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, on Wed., Oct. 12, 2022. Iezzoni is a Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and a researcher at Massachusetts General Hospital. Iezzoni, 68, has been diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) for 46 years and has personally experienced some of the same difficulties in accessing healthcare as is described in her research.

Chris Miller, author of Chip War, for Baillie Gifford & Co's Trust magazine

Chris Miller is an Associate Professor of International History at the Fletcher School at Tufts University, seen here in the Fletcher School's Ginn Library Reading Room in Medford, Massachusetts, USA, on Wed., Nov. 23, 2022. Miller is the author of the book "Chip War: The fight for the world's most critical technology," which tells the story of microchip development over the past decades, published by Scribner on Oct. 4, 2022.
Chris Miller is an Associate Professor of International History at the Fletcher School at Tufts University, seen here in the Fletcher School's Ginn Library Reading Room in Medford, Massachusetts, USA, on Wed., Nov. 23, 2022. Miller is the author of the book "Chip War: The fight for the world's most critical technology," which tells the story of microchip development over the past decades, published by Scribner on Oct. 4, 2022.
Chris Miller is an Associate Professor of International History at the Fletcher School at Tufts University, seen here in Tufts' Academic Quad in Medford, Massachusetts, USA, on Wed., Nov. 23, 2022. Miller is the author of the book "Chip War: The fight for the world's most critical technology," which tells the story of microchip development over the past decades, published by Scribner on Oct. 4, 2022.
Chris Miller is an Associate Professor of International History at the Fletcher School at Tufts University, seen here in the Fletcher School's Ginn Library Reading Room in Medford, Massachusetts, USA, on Wed., Nov. 23, 2022. Miller is the author of the book "Chip War: The fight for the world's most critical technology," which tells the story of microchip development over the past decades, published by Scribner on Oct. 4, 2022.
Chris Miller is an Associate Professor of International History at the Fletcher School at Tufts University, seen here in Tufts' Academic Quad in Medford, Massachusetts, USA, on Wed., Nov. 23, 2022. Miller is the author of the book "Chip War: The fight for the world's most critical technology," which tells the story of microchip development over the past decades, published by Scribner on Oct. 4, 2022.
Chris Miller is an Associate Professor of International History at the Fletcher School at Tufts University, seen here in the Fletcher School's Ginn Library Reading Room in Medford, Massachusetts, USA, on Wed., Nov. 23, 2022. Miller is the author of the book "Chip War: The fight for the world's most critical technology," which tells the story of microchip development over the past decades, published by Scribner on Oct. 4, 2022.

Computer science pioneer Latanya Sweeney for Harvard Kennedy School Magazine

Latanya Sweeney is the Daniel Paul Professor of the Practice of Government and Technology at the Harvard Kennedy School, seen here at the Harvard Kennedy School in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on Mon., June 6, 2022. Sweeney is the first black woman to receive a PhD in computer science from MIT (2001), and according to her HKS bio, has 3 patents, more than 100 academic publications, pioneered the field known as data privacy, launched the emerging area known as algorithmic fairness, and her work is explicitly cited in two U.S. regulations, including the U.S. federal medical privacy regulation (known as HIPAA).
Latanya Sweeney is the Daniel Paul Professor of the Practice of Government and Technology at the Harvard Kennedy School, seen here at the Harvard Kennedy School in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on Mon., June 6, 2022. Sweeney is the first black woman to receive a PhD in computer science from MIT (2001), and according to her HKS bio, has 3 patents, more than 100 academic publications, pioneered the field known as data privacy, launched the emerging area known as algorithmic fairness, and her work is explicitly cited in two U.S. regulations, including the U.S. federal medical privacy regulation (known as HIPAA).
Latanya Sweeney is the Daniel Paul Professor of the Practice of Government and Technology at the Harvard Kennedy School, seen here at the Harvard Kennedy School in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on Mon., June 6, 2022. Sweeney is the first black woman to receive a PhD in computer science from MIT (2001), and according to her HKS bio, has 3 patents, more than 100 academic publications, pioneered the field known as data privacy, launched the emerging area known as algorithmic fairness, and her work is explicitly cited in two U.S. regulations, including the U.S. federal medical privacy regulation (known as HIPAA).
Latanya Sweeney is the Daniel Paul Professor of the Practice of Government and Technology at the Harvard Kennedy School, seen here at the Harvard Kennedy School in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on Mon., June 6, 2022. Sweeney is the first black woman to receive a PhD in computer science from MIT (2001), and according to her HKS bio, has 3 patents, more than 100 academic publications, pioneered the field known as data privacy, launched the emerging area known as algorithmic fairness, and her work is explicitly cited in two U.S. regulations, including the U.S. federal medical privacy regulation (known as HIPAA).
Latanya Sweeney is the Daniel Paul Professor of the Practice of Government and Technology at the Harvard Kennedy School, seen here at the Harvard Kennedy School in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on Mon., June 6, 2022. Sweeney is the first black woman to receive a PhD in computer science from MIT (2001), and according to her HKS bio, has 3 patents, more than 100 academic publications, pioneered the field known as data privacy, launched the emerging area known as algorithmic fairness, and her work is explicitly cited in two U.S. regulations, including the U.S. federal medical privacy regulation (known as HIPAA).

Ovid Therapeutics CEO Jeremy Levin for Spectrum News

Dr. Jeremy Levin is Chairman and CEO of Ovid Therapeutics, a biopharmaceutical company based in NYC that according to a recent press release is "developing medicines designed to conquer epilepsy and meaningfully improve the lives of people affected by brain disorders," seen here in a tissue culture lab at Tufts Launchpad Biolabs where the company has lab space in Boston, Massachusetts, USA, on Thu., Oct. 13, 2022.
Dr. Jeremy Levin is Chairman and CEO of Ovid Therapeutics, a biopharmaceutical company based in NYC that according to a recent press release is "developing medicines designed to conquer epilepsy and meaningfully improve the lives of people affected by brain disorders," seen here in Ovid's labspace at Tufts Launchpad Biolabs in Boston, Massachusetts, USA, on Thu., Oct. 13, 2022.
Dr. Jeremy Levin is Chairman and CEO of Ovid Therapeutics, a biopharmaceutical company based in NYC that according to a recent press release is "developing medicines designed to conquer epilepsy and meaningfully improve the lives of people affected by brain disorders," seen here in Ovid's labspace at Tufts Launchpad Biolabs in Boston, Massachusetts, USA, on Thu., Oct. 13, 2022.
Dr. Jeremy Levin is Chairman and CEO of Ovid Therapeutics, a biopharmaceutical company based in NYC that according to a recent press release is "developing medicines designed to conquer epilepsy and meaningfully improve the lives of people affected by brain disorders," seen here in Tufts Launchpad Biolabs where the company has lab space in Boston, Massachusetts, USA, on Thu., Oct. 13, 2022.
Dr. Jeremy Levin is Chairman and CEO of Ovid Therapeutics, a biopharmaceutical company based in NYC that according to a recent press release is "developing medicines designed to conquer epilepsy and meaningfully improve the lives of people affected by brain disorders," seen here in Tufts Launchpad Biolabs where the company has lab space in Boston, Massachusetts, USA, on Thu., Oct. 13, 2022.

Sherry Mendelson, author of essay about accepting care after knee replacements, for the Wall Street Journal

WELLESLEY, MASSACHUSETTS - NOV 11, 2022. Sherry Mendelson, 71, of Palos Verdes, Calif., is a retired psychiatrist who had both of her knees replaced surgically in 2021. She is seen here near her daughter's home in Wellesley, Massachusetts, USA, on Fri., Nov. 11, 2022. In a personal essay, Mendelson said it was difficult to depend on others, including husband Fred Davidowitz, while recovering from the surgeries. Mendelson says her knees are as good as new now; she recently participated in an over-age-45 tennis tournament and said her team finished in the middle of the pack. 

CREDIT: M. Scott Brauer for the Wall Street Journal
ENKNEE
WELLESLEY, MASSACHUSETTS - NOV 11, 2022. Sherry Mendelson, 71, (right) of Palos Verdes, Calif., is a retired psychiatrist who had both of her knees replaced surgically in 2021. She is seen here with husband Fred Davidowitz, 76, a retired dentist, in Perrin Park near their daughter's home in Wellesley, Massachusetts, USA, on Fri., Nov. 11, 2022. In a personal essay, Mendelson said it was difficult to depend on others, including husband Fred Davidowitz, while recovering from the surgeries. Mendelson says her knees are as good as new now; she recently participated in an over-age-45 tennis tournament and said her team finished in the middle of the pack. 

CREDIT: M. Scott Brauer for the Wall Street Journal
ENKNEE
WELLESLEY, MASSACHUSETTS - NOV 11, 2022. Sherry Mendelson, 71, (right) of Palos Verdes, Calif., holds hands with husband Fred Davidowitz, 76, near their daughter's home in Wellesley, Massachusetts, USA, on Fri., Nov. 11, 2022. Mendelson is a retired psychiatrist who had both of her knees replaced surgically in 2021. In a personal essay, Mendelson said it was difficult to depend on others, including husband Fred Davidowitz, while recovering from the surgeries. Mendelson says her knees are as good as new now; she recently participated in an over-age-45 tennis tournament and said her team finished in the middle of the pack. 

CREDIT: M. Scott Brauer for the Wall Street Journal
ENKNEE
WELLESLEY, MASSACHUSETTS - NOV 11, 2022. Sherry Mendelson, 71, of Palos Verdes, Calif., is a retired psychiatrist who had both of her knees replaced surgically in 2021. She is seen here with husband Fred Davidowitz, 76, a retired dentist, in Perrin Park near their daughter's home in Wellesley, Massachusetts, USA, on Fri., Nov. 11, 2022. In a personal essay, Mendelson said it was difficult to depend on others, including husband Fred Davidowitz, while recovering from the surgeries. Mendelson says her knees are as good as new now; she recently participated in an over-age-45 tennis tournament and said her team finished in the middle of the pack. 

CREDIT: M. Scott Brauer for the Wall Street Journal
ENKNEE
WELLESLEY, MASSACHUSETTS - NOV 11, 2022. Sherry Mendelson, 71, of Palos Verdes, Calif., is a retired psychiatrist who had both of her knees replaced surgically in 2021. She is seen here in Perrin Park near her daughter's home in Wellesley, Massachusetts, USA, on Fri., Nov. 11, 2022. In a personal essay, Mendelson said it was difficult to depend on others, including husband Fred Davidowitz, while recovering from the surgeries. Mendelson says her knees are as good as new now; she recently participated in an over-age-45 tennis tournament and said her team finished in the middle of the pack. 

CREDIT: M. Scott Brauer for the Wall Street Journal
ENKNEE
WELLESLEY, MASSACHUSETTS - NOV 11, 2022. Sherry Mendelson, 71, (left) of Palos Verdes, Calif., is a retired psychiatrist who had both of her knees replaced surgically in 2021. She is seen here with husband Fred Davidowitz, 76, a retired dentist, near their daughter's home in Wellesley, Massachusetts, USA, on Fri., Nov. 11, 2022. In a personal essay, Mendelson said it was difficult to depend on others, including husband Fred Davidowitz, while recovering from the surgeries. Mendelson says her knees are as good as new now; she recently participated in an over-age-45 tennis tournament and said her team finished in the middle of the pack. 

CREDIT: M. Scott Brauer for the Wall Street Journal
ENKNEE

Inside W. H. Bagshaw’s factory for the New York Times


The shop floor is filled with industrial metalworking machines at the W. H. Bagshaw manufacturing company in Nashua, New Hampshire, USA, on Tue., Dec. 20, 2022. The company makes metal components for the aerospace and medical industries and has fewer than 50 employees. Over the past two years, high turnover among employees has led to slower production.

For the New York Times, I spent an a little time in the W. H. Bagshaw’s factory in Nashua, New Hampshire, a beautiful facility that’s more than a century old. The company specializes in small machined metal and wire pieces for the aerospace and medical sectors, but which has also included phonograph needles over the years. 

The story is about how high turnover in manufacturing and other sectors has led to a decrease in productivity due to the time it takes to retrain new hires. 

Machinist Aaron Nickerson has worked at the W. H. Bagshaw manufacturing company for the past seven years in Nashua, New Hampshire, USA, on Tue., Dec. 20, 2022. Here he's working with a CNC Swiss-style lathe. The company makes metal components for the aerospace and medical industries and has fewer than 50 employees. Over the past two years, high turnover among employees has led to slower production.
Daniel DeForte has worked at the W. H. Bagshaw manufacturing company for the past year in Nashua, New Hampshire, USA, on Tue., Dec. 20, 2022. DeForte works as a cleaner and inspector of finished parts and here he's performing final visual inspection of small metal medical components used in valve assemblies. The company makes metal components for the aerospace and medical industries and has fewer than 50 employees. Over the past two years, high turnover among employees has led to slower production.
Daniel DeForte has worked at the W. H. Bagshaw manufacturing company for the past year in Nashua, New Hampshire, USA, on Tue., Dec. 20, 2022. DeForte works as a cleaner and inspector of finished parts and here he's performing final visual inspection of small metal medical components used in valve assemblies. The company makes metal components for the aerospace and medical industries and has fewer than 50 employees. Over the past two years, high turnover among employees has led to slower production.
Sobeyda Rodriguez, a machine operator in the Knurling Department, has worked at the W. H. Bagshaw manufacturing company for the past 10 years in Nashua, New Hampshire, USA, on Tue., Dec. 20, 2022. Here she using a machine to add knurling to small metal pins. The company makes metal components for the aerospace and medical industries and has fewer than 50 employees. Over the past two years, high turnover among employees has led to slower production.
Scrap metal produced after machining metal parts fill a bin on the shop floor at the W. H. Bagshaw manufacturing company in Nashua, New Hampshire, USA, on Tue., Dec. 20, 2022. The company makes metal components for the aerospace and medical industries and has fewer than 50 employees. Over the past two years, high turnover among employees has led to slower production.
A bin full of partially finished metal pins stands on the shop floor at the W. H. Bagshaw manufacturing company in Nashua, New Hampshire, USA, on Tue., Dec. 20, 2022. The company makes metal components for the aerospace and medical industries and has fewer than 50 employees. Over the past two years, high turnover among employees has led to slower production.
Metal wire stands at the side of the shop floor of the W. H. Bagshaw manufacturing company in Nashua, New Hampshire, USA, on Tue., Dec. 20, 2022. The company makes metal components for the aerospace and medical industries and has fewer than 50 employees. Over the past two years, high turnover among employees has led to slower production.
Adria Bagshaw is the co-owner and Vice President of W. H. Bagshaw, a manufacturer in Nashua, New Hampshire, USA, on Tue., Dec. 20, 2022. The company makes metal components for the aerospace and medical industries and has fewer than 50 employees. Over the past two years, high turnover among employees has led to slower production.
Adria Bagshaw is the co-owner and Vice President of W. H. Bagshaw, a manufacturer in Nashua, New Hampshire, USA, on Tue., Dec. 20, 2022. The company makes metal components for the aerospace and medical industries and has fewer than 50 employees. Over the past two years, high turnover among employees has led to slower production.
Adria Bagshaw is the co-owner and Vice President of W. H. Bagshaw, a manufacturer in Nashua, New Hampshire, USA, on Tue., Dec. 20, 2022. The company makes metal components for the aerospace and medical industries and has fewer than 50 employees. Over the past two years, high turnover among employees has led to slower production.
CNC machinist Brett Smith has worked at W. H. Bagshaw manufacturing company for the past two years in Nashua, New Hampshire, USA, on Tue., Dec. 20, 2022. Here he's readjusting guide bushings while changing tool on a machine. The company makes metal components for the aerospace and medical industries and has fewer than 50 employees. Over the past two years, high turnover among employees has led to slower production.
Metal wire stands at the side of the shop floor of the W. H. Bagshaw manufacturing company in Nashua, New Hampshire, USA, on Tue., Dec. 20, 2022. The company makes metal components for the aerospace and medical industries and has fewer than 50 employees. Over the past two years, high turnover among employees has led to slower production.
Machinist Brian Ulrich has worked at the W. H. Bagshaw manufacturing company for the past two years in Nashua, New Hampshire, USA, on Tue., Dec. 20, 2022. Here he's putting metal bar remnants into a lathe to turn into ball bearings used in the aerospace industry. The company makes metal components for the aerospace and medical industries and has fewer than 50 employees. Over the past two years, high turnover among employees has led to slower production.
Tools hang above a workbench on the shop floor of the W. H. Bagshaw manufacturing company in Nashua, New Hampshire, USA, on Tue., Dec. 20, 2022. The company makes metal components for the aerospace and medical industries and has fewer than 50 employees. Over the past two years, high turnover among employees has led to slower production.
A machine used to straighten and cut wire stands in the shop at the W. H. Bagshaw manufacturing company in Nashua, New Hampshire, USA, on Tue., Dec. 20, 2022. The company makes metal components for the aerospace and medical industries and has fewer than 50 employees. Over the past two years, high turnover among employees has led to slower production.
Yahaira Infante, a Team Leader in the Knurling Department, has worked at the W. H. Bagshaw manufacturing company for the past 25 years in Nashua, New Hampshire, USA, on Tue., Dec. 20, 2022. Here she is looking at a job board which helps her and other departments plan tasks for the day. The company makes metal components for the aerospace and medical industries and has fewer than 50 employees. Over the past two years, high turnover among employees has led to slower production.
An AFL-CIO union sticker reading "America works best when we say Union Yes" adorns a locker in the shop at the W. H. Bagshaw manufacturing company in Nashua, New Hampshire, USA, on Tue., Dec. 20, 2022. The company makes metal components for the aerospace and medical industries and has fewer than 50 employees. Over the past two years, high turnover among employees has led to slower production.