From fecal transplants to nuclear disarmament: recent work for the Chronicle of Higher Education


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I’ve had a busy month and a half of work in Massachusetts and Rhode Island for the Chronicle of Higher Education, one of my favorite publications to work for. The subjects have been all over the place, from a jars of fecal transplant material with Open Biome at MIT to the Kennedy Library for a portrait of Harvard professor Elaine Scarry on her book about how nuclear capability is fundamentally at odds with democracy to the University of Massachusetts – Amherst’s plans to reduce the size of its campus to an interdisciplinary graduate program at Brown University (where I photographed grad student Arielle Schilit Nitenson, who’s researching how smell operates in mice).

If you’re a subscriber, you can read the articles at these links: Less is More: Campus Officials Trim Square Feet to Cut Costs, Student-Led Project Banks on Promise of Fecal Transplants, A Literary Scholar’s Voice in the Wilderness: Elaine Scarry fights American complacency about nuclear arms, and Brown U. Tests Approach to Interdisciplinary Graduate Work.

All content © 2005-2019 M. Scott Brauer
error: All images and text © M. Scott Brauer 2005-present